Red Creek Blueway

Red Creek is a coastal blackwater stream that forms near Lumberton in Lamar County and ends when it meets Black Creek near the Pascagoula River in Jackson County. It gets its name from the reddish stain that naturally-occurring tannins impart to the water.

In 2004, the watershed was documented as 66% forested with a 100 foot, well-forested riparian zone extending from Highway 26 (west of Wiggins) to its confluence with Black Creek. This section of Red Creek is a public waterway and, according to Ernest Herndon’s Canoeing Mississippi, is a beautiful float trip. The Mississippi Museum of Natural Science has documented 61 species of freshwater and diadromous fish with a recreational fishery for at least 5 species. Red Creek has been designated as one of Mississippi’s Scenic Streams.
Download Red Creek Blueway Map

Red Creek Blueway consists of four segments.
Clay Shelves Segment
A 9.7 mile float from Highway 26 to Highway 49. To float a flat bottom boat plan for 9.5 hours. Canoes and kayaks plan for 7.5 hours. While floating this upper reach segment you’ll discover first hand how Red Creek got its name. As you traverse along the red clay shelves, you’ll also encounter several small rapids.

Railroad Trestle Segment
A 6.2 mile float from Highway 49 to City Bridge. to float a flat bottom boat plan for 6 hours. Canoes and kayaks plan for 5 hours. Discover large white sandbars as Red Creek meanders its way through the sandy soils of mid Stone County. You’ll also pass beneath the high railroad trestle still in service today.

Red Bluff Segment
A 9.6 mile float from City Bridge to Cable Bridge. To float a flat bottom boat plan for 8.5 hours. Canoes and kayaks plan for 6.5 hours. You will navigate through the remains of several old rail dummy lines bearing witness to the vast timber harvest of the early 1900’s. If you’re lucky, you’ll see glimpses through the trees of the famous “Red Bluff.”

Natural Springs Segment
a 4.4 mile float from Cable Bridge to Highway 15. To float a flat bottom boat plan for 4 hours. Canoes and kayaks plan for 3 hours. enjoy a short but picturesque float through the Desoto National Forest. Floaters will discover the natural springs feeding the creek as they get closer to the historic site of the Ramsey Springs Hotel.

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